2009 US Coins

2009 brings a new year for some spectacular coins from the United States Mint. Extremely popular coins this year include the Ultra High Relief $20 Double Eagle gold coin and commemorative bicentennial Lincoln coins.

Then, of course, let's not forget the uniquely designed 2009 Louis Braille Silver Dollars that were recently launched.

Collectors looking for information on newer US Mint coins may be interested in the 2010 US Coins page.

2009 Commemorative Silver Dollars

Proof Lincoln Silver Dollar
Uncirculated Lincoln Silver Dollar
Proof Braille Silver Dollar
Uncirculated Braille Silver Dollar

2009 Lincoln Bicentennial Cents

Lincoln Cent Birthplace
Lincoln Cent Formative Years
Lincoln Cent Professional Life
Lincoln Cent Presidency

2009 Gold, Platinum and Silver Coins*

2009 Ultra High Relief Gold Coin
Proof Gold American Eagle Coin
Proof Gold

Eagle

Uncirculated Gold American Eagle
Uncirculated

Gold Eagle

American Gold Buffalo Coin
Proof Platinum American Eagle Coin
Proof Silver American Eagle Coin
Proof Silver

Eagle

Uncirculated Silver American Eagle Coin
Uncirculated

Silver Eagle

2009 Presidential $1 Coins*

Harrison Presidential $1
John Tyler Presidential $1 Coin
James K. Polk Presidential $1 Coin
Zachary Taylor Presidential $1 Coin

2009 First Spouse Coins*

2009 Anna Harrison First Spouse Gold Coin
2009 Letitia Tyler First Spouse Gold Design
Julia Tyler First Spouse Gold Coin
2009 Sarah Polk First Spouse Gold Coin
2009 Margaret Taylor First Spouse Gold Design

2009 D.C. & US Territories Quarters*

District of Columbia Quarter
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Quarter
Guam Quarter
American Samoa Quarter
U.S. Virgin Islands Quarter
Northern Mariana Islands

2009 Native American Coin

2009 Native American $1 Coin

 

*Not all 2009 coins have been released by the US Mint yet, or issued individually. Several may be purchased within annual sets, like the 2009 Presidential $1 coins and the D.C. & US Territories Quarters.

 


 

2009 US Coins Guide

Below is a guide to newly introduced coin design themes for 2009, as well as brief details for each. For more information on these coins, simply click on any of the coin images below, or above.

2009 Commemorative Silver Dollars

In any given year, the United States Mint is authorized to issue two commemorative coins. It is not the Mint that decides which coins are to be minted, but coin legislation that was introduced in the Senate or House, passed by both chambers and then signed into law by the President. This often occurs years before a coin is actually designed and minted.

Coin featuring Abraham Lincoln and Louis Braille in both proof an uncirculated conditions are the commemorative dollars for 2009. Brief descriptions of each follow.

Abraham Lincoln Bicentennial Silver Dollars

These coins mark the 200th anniversary of Abraham Lincoln's birth.

Proof Lincoln Silver Dollar
Uncirculated Lincoln Silver Dollar

 

The obverse features a likeness of President Lincoln based on Daniel Chester French's famous sculpture which sits inside the Lincoln Memorial in Washington D.C. The reverse includes the last 43 words of Abraham Lincoln's most famous speech, the Gettysburg Address.

Louis Braille Silver Dollars

Like the Lincoln dollars, the Louis Braille Silver Dollars celebrate the bicentennial birth of Louis Braille, inventor of the Braille system, which is used by the blind and visually impaired to read and write.

Proof Braille Silver Dollar
Uncirculated Braille Silver Dollar

 

The obverse of the coin features a portrait of Braille. The reverse shows a child reading a book in Braille. The word "Braille" (abbreviated Brl in Braille code) is depicted in the upper field, and the word "INDEPENDANCE" is shown on a bookcase behind the child.

2009 Lincoln Bicentennial Cents

In addition to the commemorative silver dollars, four newly designed 2009 Lincoln coins were authorized to celebrate Lincoln's birth and the 100th anniversary of the first issuance of the Lincoln cent in 1909. These have proven to be extremely popular with collectors and the public at large.

Lincoln Cent Birthplace
Lincoln Cent Formative Years
Lincoln Cent Professional Life
Lincoln Cent Presidency

 

The four designs featured on the reverse of the Lincoln pennies represent four major aspects of President Lincoln's life: his birth and childhood in Kentucky, his formative years in Indiana, his professional life in Illinois and his Presidency in Washington, D.C.

The obverse (heads side) of the one-cent coins continue to bear Victor D Brenner's likeness of President Lincoln, introduced in 1909.

2009 D.C. & US Territories Quarters

With the conclusion of the highly successful 50 States Quarters® Program in 2008, Congress authorized a new series of six quarters in 2009 to honor the District of Columbia and U.S. Territories: the Commonwealth of Puerto Rico, Guam, American Samoa, the U.S. Virgin Islands and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands.

District of Columbia Quarter
Commonwealth of Puerto Rico Quarter
Guam Quarter
American Samoa Quarter
U.S. Virgin Islands Quarter
Northern Mariana Islands

 

The same George Washington image on the obverse of each coin is depicted. The reverses, however, feature designs symbolic of DC and the territories:

  • DC - In the coin honoring the capital, Duke Ellington, a native of D.C., is featured. Born in 1899, Ellington started piano lessons at age 7. This led to a life-long career as a world-renowned musician and composer. The included "JUSTICE FOR ALL" inscription is the motto of Washington D.C.,
  • Puerto Rico - San Juan, capitol city of Puerto Rico, is characterized by the walls of stone that served to protect it during the centuries of conflict it had seen. Sentry boxes located at strategic points of the wall help to symbolize its strength. The inscription "ISLA DEL ENCANTO" means Isle of Enchantment.
  • Guam - Guam's original inhabitants, the Chamorros, are believed to have arrived from Indonesia around 4,000 years ago. The reverse incorporates an outline of the island of Guam, with custom built boat known as a flying proa is showcased along with a latte stone (an architectural structure built all over the island for millennia). The inscription Guahan I Tanó ManChamorro, meaning Guam - Land of the Chamorro, is also present.
  • American Samoa is a group of five islands and two coral atolls in the South Pacific Ocean, roughly between Hawaii and Australia. These islands are thought to be first inhabited around 1000 BC, but were not reached by European settlers until the eighteenth century. The reverse features the ceremonial items of an ava bowl, whisk and staff along with a coconut tree on the shore. An inscription "SAMOA MUAMUA LE ATUA", the motto of American Samoa, means "Samoa, God is First."
  • The US Virgin Islands were originally settled by the tribes of the Ciboney, Carib, and Arawaks. Named by Christopher Columbis in 1493 for Saint Ursula and her virgin followers, the islands were under the control of several European powers for over three hundred years.

    An outline of the three major islands (St. Croix, St. Thomas and St. John) of the US Virgin Islands is featured on the reverse. Also shown is the official bird of the territory the yellow breast, sometimes called the banana quit, as well as the yellow cedar or yellow elder, the official flower. A Tyre Palm Tree appears along with the inscriptions, U.S. VIRGIN ISLANDS and United in Pride and Hope, the official motto of the territory.

  • Northern Mariana Islands - The Chamorro, natives of the islands, were first met by European settlers when explorer Ferdinand Magellan arrived in 1521. In 1668 the islands were renamed Las Marianas after Mariana of Austria, widow of Spain's Philip IV.

    The reverse design represents the wealth of the islands in its natural resources of land, air and sea. A large limestone Latte stands near the shore. A canoe is present to represents the people's excellent seafaring skills. Two white fairy tern birds fly overhead while a Carolinian mwar (head lei) borders the bottom.

 


 

About the United States Mint

Congress created the United States Mint on April 2, 1792, and placed it within the Department of State.

The U.S. Mint was made an independent agency in 1799, and under the Coinage Act of 1873, became part of the Treasury Department. It was placed under the auspices of the Secretary of the Treasury of the United States in 1981.

The Mint has seen significant changes in its over 200 year history.

Today, the US Mint brings in more than $1 billion in revenue annually and employs over 2,200 employees. It’s the world’s largest producer of coins, medals and other numismatic products.

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